Non-HDL cholesterol is calculated by subtracting the HDL cholesterol from the total cholesterol. It represents all the “bad” types of cholesterol, including LDL (Low-Density Lipoprotein) and VLDL (Very Low-Density Lipoprotein), which are associated with the buildup of plaque in the arteries and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

• High Levels: Elevated non-HDL cholesterol levels indicate a higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke. It suggests an accumulation of cholesterol in the arteries. The ideal level for non-HDL cholesterol depends on individual risk factors, but generally, a level below 4 mmol/L is considered normal.

• Low Levels: Lower non-HDL cholesterol levels are usually considered beneficial and suggest a lower risk of heart disease. However, extremely low levels should be evaluated by a healthcare provider to rule out any underlying health issues.

Non-HDL Cholesterol

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